Making new bolts look old…

I have said over and over that I LOVE custom orders.

I had a great time making a super sharp bill hook for some really great folks. Check out there wonderful blog.. https://whollyholyliving.com/

This week, through a friend, I got a commission to build a gun rack.

Now, you might ask what’s so special about a gun rack?

Well…it’s for something called a “punt gun”. Prior to this I had never heard of one. Apparently, during the late 1800s and early 1900s some people would commercially harvest wild ducks and other birds. As with any commercial operation these guys wanted to increase their yield.

Somewhere along the way, someone went to a gunsmith and had them create a muzzleloading shotgun that is over 10 feet long and weighs over 85 pounds! The barrel itself is 2 1/2 inches a cross! This allowed them to shoot a large number of birds from a great distance. Seems a bit unfair to me and I’m glad that its now a display piece, but its still really interesting.

This one is estimated to mid 1800s.

That brings me to the challenge, and the title of this post.

I have to make hooks that mount to a board (prettied up, of course), and then mount that board to a brick wall. Gret big ol’ blacksmith engineering challenge. I started the hooks for the board and will have some photos later as they develop. He wants the whole thing to look a bit rustic, so we couldn’t just use regular store bought looking lag bolts to mount it to the wall. I took 8 lag bolts and converted the heads to be pyramid shaped in the old decorative style.

I really like the look of old bolts like that, and if I had my choice, all bolts would look that way!

So, even though they are new, they look nice and old fashioned now.

With me year coming up, here’s to you and here’s to hoping 2019 is a wonderful year full of challenges and success. Challenges are what builds us.

Happy New Year and all the best to you!

Chad

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3 thoughts on “Making new bolts look old…

  1. J > Here in the UK we call those coach screws. And yes the old hand forged ones had square heads. They were used a lot in coach-work (the equivalent now would be welding of vehicle chassis!) but I’ve also encountered them in old buildings, especially in timber roof structures. You’ve done a good job there : I hope it’s appreciated!

    Liked by 1 person

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